Getting SMSC into every lessson

What is SMSC?

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SMSC stands for Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural.

All schools in England must show how well their pupils develop in SMSC and will be measured on how these elements are embedded across the curriculum.

I teach in a secondary school and below I have included some of the ways I approach each element of SMSC in my Maths lessons.Having supported staff in other curriculum areas on this topic I can confidently say these examples are easily implemented into any curriculum area. 

Spiritual

  • Encourage students to explore and develop what animates themselves and others through focused project work which includes photos, posters and other work produced by students.
  • Develop a climate or ethos within which pupils can grow and flourish, respect others and be respected by allowing students the opportunity to offer their ideas and feel comfortable that they will be supported by teacher and peers.
  • Develop a sense of belonging by being an effective member of learning group.
  • Value students’ questions and give them space for their own thoughts, ideas and concerns.
  • Encourage students to relate their learning to a wider frame of reference – for example, asking ‘why’, ‘how’ and ‘where’ as well as ‘what’.
  • Encourage students to take responsibility for their actions – for example, respect for property, care of the environment and developing codes of behaviour.

Moral

  • Through the quality of relationships and interactions, model the principles which they wish to promote – for example, fairness, integrity, respect for others, students’ welfare, respect for minority interests, resolution of conflict, keeping promises and contracts.
  • Recognise and respect the codes and morals of different cultures represented in the school and wider community.
  • Encourage students to take responsibility for their actions – for example, respect for property, care of the environment and developing codes of behaviour.
  • Develop an open and safe learning environment in which students can express their views and practice moral decision-making.

Social

  • Help students develop personal qualities which are valued in a civilised society, for example, thoughtfulness, honesty, respect for difference, moral principles, independence, inter-dependence, self-respect.
  • Provide opportunities for students to exercise leadership and responsibility by supporting the learning of their peers in class and extra curricular sessions.
  • Encourage students to work cooperatively through group work and peer assessment activities exploring their own and others’ views.

Cultural

  • Provide opportunities for students to explore their own cultural assumptions and values by participating in whole school themed weeks.
  • Extend students’ knowledge and use of cultural imagery and language by exploring how different cultures have influenced the way we use Mathematics.